This snapshot goes beyond traditional measures of postsecondary attainment by tracking the fall 2009 entering cohort over time, and showing persistence, stop-out, and completion rates at the end of each subsequent academic year. The model tracks outcomes for both full-time and part-time starters, and takes spring and summer terms into account.

All Institutional Sectors First-Time, Full-Time

Figure 1 shows yearly success and progress rates for individuals who began college in Fall 2009 as full-time degree-seeking students. It shows the highest level of academic progress made by these students at the end of each subsequent academic year. By the end of year four, 39.0 percent had completed a postsecondary credential, while 25.4 percent were no longer enrolled. By the end of year six, 59.1 percent had graduated, while 29.7 percent had left college without earning a credential.

The outcome categories are modeled after those used in the Student Achievement Measure (SAM), and can be used by participating institutions for benchmarking purposes.

More detailed notes on the cohort and outcome definitions are included at the end of this report.

Snapshot20-fig1

All Institutional Sectors First-Time, Part-Time

Figure 2 shows yearly success and progress rates for individuals who began college in Fall 2009 as part-time degree-seeking students. By the end of year four, 18.2 percent had completed a postsecondary credential, while 39.7 percent were no longer enrolled. By the end of year six, 36.7 percent had graduated, while 44.8 percent had left college without earning a credential.

Snapshot20-fig2

Four-Year Publics First-Time, Full-Time

Figure 3 shows yearly success and progress rates for individuals who began college in Fall 2009 as full-time degree-seeking students at four-year public institutions.  By the end of year four, 38.4 percent had completed a postsecondary credential, while 16.7 percent were no longer enrolled. By the end of year six, 67.5 percent had graduated, while 21.2 percent had left college without earning a credential.

Snapshot20-fig3

Four-Year Publics First-Time, Part-Time

Figure 4 shows yearly success and progress rates for individuals who began college in Fall 2009 as part-time degree-seeking students at four-year public institutions. By the end of year four, 15.6 percent had completed a postsecondary credential, while 36.1 percent were no longer enrolled. By the end of year six, 40.2 percent had graduated, while 39.4 percent had left college without earning a credential.

Snapshot20-fig4

Four-Year Privates First-Time, Full-Time

Figure 5 shows yearly success and progress rates for individuals who began college in Fall 2009 as full-time degree-seeking students at four-year private non-profit institutions. By the end of year four, 57.3 percent completed a postsecondary credential, while 13.6 percent were no longer enrolled. By the end of year six, 74.7 percent had graduated, while 17.8 percent had left college without earning a credential.

Snapshot20-fig5

Four-Year Privates First-Time, Part-Time

Figure 6 shows yearly success and progress rates for individuals who began college in Fall 2009 as part-time degree-seeking students at four-year private non-profit institutions. By the end of year four, 23.3 percent had completed a postsecondary credential, while 31.7 percent were no longer enrolled. By the end of year six, 49.8 percent had graduated, while 34.6 percent had left college without earning a credential.

Snapshot20-fig6

Four-Year For-Profits First-Time, Full-Time

Figure 7 shows yearly success and progress rates for individuals who began college in Fall 2009 as full-time degree-seeking students at four-year for-profit institutions. By the end of year four, 30.9 percent had completed a postsecondary credential, while 52.3 percent were no longer enrolled. By the end of year six, 37.5 percent had graduated, while 54.1 percent had left college without earning a credential. Note that most of the Year 2 and Year 3 completions in the for-profit sector are for associate degrees.

Snapshot20-fig7

Four-Year For-Profits First-Time, Part-Time

Figure 8 shows yearly success and progress rates for individuals who began college in Fall 2009 as part-time degree-seeking students at four-year for-profit institutions. By the end of year four, 19.3 percent had completed a postsecondary credential, while 54.4 percent were no longer enrolled. By the end of year six, 26.9 percent had graduated, while 61.5 percent had left college without earning a credential. Note that most of the Year 2 and Year 3 completions in the for-profit sector are for associate degrees.

Snapshot20-fig8

Two-Year Publics First-Time, Full-Time

Figure 9 shows yearly success and progress rates for individuals who began college in Fall 2009 as full-time degree-seeking students at two-year public institutions. By the end of year three, 67.3 percent had either completed a postsecondary credential (22.1 percent), were still enrolled in college (43.5 percent), or had transferred to a different institution before withdrawing (1.7 percent).

Snapshot20-fig9

Two-Year Publics First-Time, Part-Time

Figure 10 shows yearly success and progress rates for individuals who began college in Fall 2009 as part-time degree-seeking students at two-year public institutions. By the end of year three, 67.7 percent had either completed a postsecondary credential (11.9 percent), were still enrolled in college (53.7percent), or had transferred to a different institution before withdrawing (2.1 percent).

Snapshot20-fig10

Outcome Definitions for Yearly Success and Progress Rates

Students are counted in only one outcome category per year (the highest ranking outcome they achieve in any particular year). The outcome categories are defined below, listed in hierarchical order. Academic years run from July 1 through June 30.

Graduated from Starting Institution – Student received a certificate or degree from the same institution in which she started college. Once a student completes a credential at the starting institution, the student will be counted in this category in all subsequent years since this is the highest ranking outcome in this model.

Transferred & Graduated from Other Institution – Student did not receive a credential from the starting institution, but did receive a certificate or degree from a different institution. Student will be counted in this category in all subsequent years unless the student eventually completes a credential at the starting institution.

Enrolled at Starting Institution – Student has not yet received a certificate or degree, but is still enrolled at the starting institution.

Transferred and Enrolled at Other Institution – Student has not yet received a certificate or degree, but is still enrolled in college at an institution other than the starting institution.

Not Enrolled – Student had no college enrollments during the academic year in question. This is not a terminal outcome. In other words, a student can be counted as not enrolled in one academic year, but then counted as enrolled in a subsequent year if the student returns to college.

For two-year institutions only, the not enrolled category is further disaggregated into the following two categories:

Transferred and No Longer Enrolled – Student had no enrollments for the academic year in question, but in a previous academic year, had transferred to an institution other than the starting institution.

Never Transferred and Not Enrolled – Student had no enrollments during the academic year in question, and had never transferred to an institution other than the starting institution.

About the Cohort – This snapshot report is based on the cohort of Fall 2009 entering students extracted for NSC Signature Report #10 on Degree Completions. Detailed notes on the cohort, including determination of degree-seeking status, can be found in the appendices of that report: https://nscresearchcenter.org/signaturereport10/

Note on Certificates – Unlike the Student Achievement Measure, this snapshot includes postsecondary certificates in graduation counts for four-year institutions. The inclusion of certificates increases six-year graduation counts by 1.7 percent at four-year publics, 0.7 percent at four-year private nonprofits, and 3.7 percent at four-year for-profits.

Community Colleges Outcomes Report

The Role of Community Colleges in Postsecondary Success

The Community Colleges Outcomes Report, “The Role of Community Colleges in Postsecondary Success,” provides recent report findings from the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center on two-year colleges. Key community college metrics are provided for three areas — college access and persistence, transfer and mobility, and certificate and degree completion – which are important indicators of community college progress.